William B. Ogden Radio School





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Hi. I'm from the Class of Apr-Jun, 1967. For what it's worth; I was Bill's personal masseuse in that I gave him neck massages with his electrical massager on a daily basis. Was I a 'Kiss-up'? Hell, yes. I was barely 18 at the time and this was my first trip on my own away from home. Does anybody else remember the planes taking off and heading right for the Dorms? My career as a DJ lasted about 5-6 years, but, I will always treasure the time I spent at Bill's. And remember: "Coffee's, get 'em High".

Added: September 12, 2012
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My friend Rick Bailey and I lived in tiny Lompoc, California, and during our junior year in high school we heard that the local station, KNEZ, needed a weekend guy. Rick convinced me to go with him to try out for the job. Neither one of us had ever worked in radio, but the PD (radio name Scott Donahue, but real name Don Barrett) said one of us could have the job but we needed a third-class radiotelephone license with broadcast endorsement. Rick and I sent for the book, then went to LA to take the test. Rick failed, but I passed, so I got the job. I worked there for a while and it became obvious that you needed one of two things to work on radio: talent or a first phone. I wasn't too blessed with the former so I decided to go for the latter. Scott (I mean Don) told me about Bill Ogden's school, so I wrote to my grandmother and begged for the couple thousand dollars for the tuition. And I convinced Rick to go as well. So in the summer of 1966, between our junior and senior years in high school, we headed off to Huntingqton Beach. This was the first class in the new location and things were a little rough. For one thing there was no hot water for the first couple of weeks. We all got used to cold showers, and a few people didn't shower at all, meaning our 18 hour days locked in the room together got a little gamey. All day we'd learn electronic theory and at night we'd study math. Did I also mention that the class just before us learned when they went to the FCC to take their test that the test had been changed for the first time in years? Most of them flunked, so they extended into our class. We were in the unfortunate position of having to actually learn the material instead of being given most of the answers. Our experience and diligently writing down questions after we left the testing room made the following classes a little more successful. But let's get back to our class. Class was held Monday thrrough Saturday from 9 in the morning until 2 in the morning We usually were given a huge test on Saturday night and given the choice of either working all night to finish the test and getting Sunday off or coming back on Sunday all day. I usually came in on the Sunday. After six weeks a large group of us went into LA to take the test, gold pencils in hand. Bill had taught us that as you went through the questions, if you weren't absolutely sure of the answer, put a little mark next to it and go to the next one. When you had been through once, you would go back and count the ones you left blank. That told you what kind of chance you had of passing. When the results were in I had passed, but my friend Rick had failed! He ended up having to spend two more weeks but I went home happy and with the expectation of getting that large blue paper in the mail, thanks to Bill. I worked in small markets like Santa Maria and Oxnard for a few years, then joined the Air Force and worked in Armed Forces Radio in Spain. Upon returning to the states I stayed with it for a few years but then upon getting married and having kids I came to the realization that you can't eat glamour. So I changed careers and never returned. Still miss it though. For those of you who are fellow alumni I'll remind you of one of the memory games that Bill used to get us to remember some of the hard things. Like the Power in the Sidebands formula, or the resistor color coding. They were little chants and probably quite unacceptable in today's politically correct world. But I still remember them!

Added: September 4, 2012
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What great memories in this guestbook! Have now worked in TV for 42 years. Family moved to Seattle in 1971 and none of the TV stations would hire you without a first phone. Enrolled in ROES that summer, and what a ride it was from the damn rooster that would wake you up at 2:30 am to the excitement of taking the exam on Spring street in downtown L.A. Bill was tough, but a true friend once you got to know him. I remember his throat lozenge before each cigarette, and the first week he told me I didn't have brains God gave a tennis ball. He was always one step ahead of the FCC pulling each student aside after the exam, asking in detail if there was a new question we didn't know. After studying each night 'til midnight we would walk next door to the donut shop for fresh donuts and coffee. We would look forward to Tally and Thora walking in the classroom and Bill would shout: "Coffees Get Em High"! Have been in contact with Tom Irwin. Great Guy!

Added: August 30, 2012
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Many people have said it and I will agree and repeat. Attending Bill Ogden's school in Huntington Beach, Ca. changed my life. Andy McQuade and I flew down together to get our First Class FCC license. Andy got out in six weeks or so, but me, being a young know it all who really didn't took a bit longer. I was one of those who had trouble grasping the Math. Bill Ogden sent me home right before Christmas and said to return once the other class was going. I returned in the middle of the new year's class and was met by Bill on a Friday night. He shoved a bunch of study guides in my hands and said you're being tested in the morning.I stayed up all night and he had written a special test for me and I aced it. Bill Ogden knew I could do it, but I didn't. I kinda coasted from there and was a bit worried about the 2nd Class Test. I passed it and really cruised on the first section. When I went to the testing facility in downtown LA, I thought it was the easiest test I'd ever taken. My testmate and I were laughing so hard during the taking of it, they threatened to throw us out and fail us. We stopped the snickering long enough to finish and laughed our way out the door knowing we had passed. This was all thanks to Mr. Bill Ogden. He really did care about his students.

Added: June 5, 2012
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I attended Ogden Radio School in 1965 and worked for a number of years for KTVB in Boise. Idaho . It is great to hear from former students ,wish we could go back to those days . Later I did some writing and wrote BURIED In The HEARTLAND . John De Blieck

Added: May 24, 2012
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Thanks to ROES I was able to Broadcast from KBLU YUMA, KTKT TUCSON, KAIR TUCSON, KLIF DALLAS, KNUS DALLAS, WYSL BUFFALO, WPHD BUFFALO, WGRQ BUFFALO. GREAT SCHOOL, THEY SHOULD HAVE MORE LIKE IT.

Added: April 7, 2012
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I attended the William B. Ogden School of Radio Operational Engineering in 1968.

One problem was learning too much. When we took the test, we would have to sit and pretend to concentrate for anther 15 or 20 minutes. We didn't want it to appear that we had cheated, we had finished so quickly. :D


Added: March 26, 2012
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Iím very proud and happy to sign this guest book again, and thanks to Bob for making it possible.
ROES was definitely a turning point in my life.
In 1957 I was working an air shift, making sales and doing my own production at KSVC, a small station in Richfield, Utah, and then to ROES to help this little station even more.
Studying for, and passing the tests by learning the ways and means of Bill Ogden shaped many paths for me over the years. Not only learning the information necessary for the licenses, but the logic and analysis lessons have been invaluable.
From Richfield I went to KUED Television in Salt Lake City as an engineer, plus radio announcing at the number one radio station, KNAK. I then moved into audio production, TV and motion picture production. I finally wound up with my own recording studio, where I recorded and produced radio commercials and TV soundtracks. In the meantime, I flew a traffic reporting airplane for 15 years before and after the studio work.
During all of this, I still fondly remember the times in Burbank, and the stories and happenings during that relatively short period of time.
Thanks to ROES, radio, TV and airplanes, for making my life very fun and fulfilling.


Added: February 23, 2012
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Great to read comments of Ogden grads. Brings back memories of Bill Ogden and fellow students of my class in January '69. Thanks!

Never could get a real job - still in radio.


Added: February 23, 2012
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I went to Ogden's in 1961. My first job was at KCEY. I think I was Jack Hamilton's replacement. He was stepping up to a Stockton station. I stayed about six months and moved on to KCTY in Salinas.

Added: February 8, 2012
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