KWG (1230 AM) in Stockton, California. KWG is one of the oldest broadcasting stations in USA, signing on December 7th, 1921. It was the first commercially-licensed radio station in the San Joaquin valley.

KWG has had myriad formats over the years, but on June 21, 1982, after nearly 18 months of country music, KWG became an "oldies" station, and was very successful into the 1990s. One of the more notable owners of KWG was Barnes Enterprises led by Johnny Jacobs, the off-screen announcer for Chuck Barris Productions' various games shows for many years. Barnes Enterprises owned KWG between 1978 and early 1981. In February 1981, Best Radio Incorporated of San Bernardino purchased KWG, along with then  KSRT 100.9 mHz, licensed to Tracy, California. KWG then began its "Delta Country" format that would run until June 21, 1982.

Until 1988, KWG used a T-antenna type transmitting antenna mounted on two 60-meter tall wooden poles, making KWG one of the last broadcast stations to use wooden

KWG, Stockton First Commercial Station in SJ Valley
antenna towers. After the replacement by a modern mast radiator, the tops of the wooden poles were scrapped and later removed completely.  Immaculate Heart Radio purchased KWG from The (Susan) Carson Group Inc. on October 18, 1999, reportedly for $300,000.

(Courtesy of Wikipedia)

Historical Facts:  In 1909, David Herrold began operating a radio station in connection with a radio school in San Jose. This was three years before Congress established radio licensing requirements. In 1913, Herrold adopted the call letters SJN. The station's letters were changed to KQW in 1921, and to KCBS in 1949. California's first commercial radio station, KQL, in Los Angeles, was licensed in 1921. KWG in Stockton was also licensed in 1921..






Historic News Clippings
Page 1
Audience Check 

The second annual study of radio audience in Modesto and Turlock has been completed by the Modesto Junior College radio workshop, and results have been sent to broadcasters by the survey director, Edward L. Mc Clarty.  A total of 7,229 calls was made over a two week period in Modesto and 1,425 were made during one week in Turlock. All calls were made between 6 and 10 PM Monday through Friday.  In Modesto, 4,655 calls were completed, of whom 2,077 said they were listening to the radio In Turlock, 867 calls were completed, of whom 398 were tune in. 

Television Queries  For the first time questions on television were asked In both cities, and McClarty said the findings were significant. During the survey, 5.6 percent of those called in Modesto said they owned TV sets. As high as 94 per cent of the TV owners were watching their sets on one night . The low for viewers was 46 per cent. McClarty compared this to radio listenership, which  showed a high of 52 percent sets  in use and a low of 39 per cent. He said the survey showed that only four radio stations serving Modesto had higher weekly audiences than combined TV stations  Expected Changes 

There were some expected changes in audience from last year, McClarty said, due to television, a new station in Modesto and changes in programming by major networks, but the same general pattern was observed. One thing the survey confirmed was that programming is the greatest Influence on dialing stations, and the audience will change stations to listen to programs they choose. McClarty  said this was true In television, too, but reception here was as Important a factor.  Increase In FM Receivers  The survey disclosed 17 per cent Increase In FM receivers Last year 25.8 per cent said they had FM.  30.2. this year.  

There  were about 30 students who participated In the studies. They  were given training in the  technique and theory of radio  audience measurement and will be able to apply their findings to their own  station's programming,  McClarty said.  Students averaged 37 calls per half hour interviewing period. McClarty said students credited much of the success of their study to the assistance given them by telephone company  personnel. 

12-6-1950
Call Letters Are Given for
Modesto's New Station 


Call letters of Modesto's newest AM radio station are KBOX. They were assigned the Stanislaus County Broadcasters by the Federal Communications Com- mission. John Boyer, director of public  relations for KBOX, said the station is scheduled to be on the air around June 1st.

Construction of a downtown studio, on Tenth near O Street, will start  in a few days. It will be of modern architecture. Off street parking areas will be provided. Transmitter site of KBOX is on the Sylvan Road. There will be three transmitter towers. The station's signal will come in on  970 on the standard radio dials.  Boyer said all necessary equipment and materials have been acquired.


2-17-51


Bill Bates prior to building KTRB Modesto owned and operated a radio repair shop in the Covell building in downtown Modesto from 1925 to 1928 .  This ad appeared on Nov. 21, 1926.

October 3, 1942


Modesto had several "air conditioned" movie theaters in the 40's and 50's including the Princess.  (June 19, 1945.)

(5-15-53)

Emergency Radio
Blackout Plan Is
Ready To Operate

SACRAMENTO—Conelrad,
an emergency plan for radio stations
designed to confuse enemy
aircraft, is ready today to operate
throughout California, state
Civil Defense headquarters an
nounced. One hundred nine of the
state's 150 standard radio stations
are equipped to change to emergency
frequencies — 640 and 1240 on
the dial— if an attack warning is
sounded. The OCD said 20 more
will be added soon.

Prevent Attacks

Conelrad, which means control
of electromagnetic radiation, is
supposed to prevent enemy pilots
from being guided to targets by
radio beams. During its use, FM
and TV stations shut down and
Conelrad equipped stations broadcast
information on the two
special frequencies.

Radio Listings in Modesto Bee in 1953

NOTICE— If your radio programs are
Interrupted and you hear the
announcement "This is a conelrad
radio alert." turn your set to 640 kcs
or 1240 kcs tor civil defense
information.

KBEE-FM................103.3 Megacycles
KFRC ................... 610  Kilocycles
KCBS....................740  Kilocycles
KNBC................... 680  Kilocycles
KMOD ................. 1360 Kilocycles
KTRB................... 860  Kilocycles
KBOX................... 970  Kilocycles

Note: KBEE is a frequency modulation
station. It operate! daily from 10 AM to
11 PM, The station cannot be received on
sets containing only AM standard radio


5-15-53

(See story on Conelrad 4)

(11-24-52)

Attorney Ralph Brown
Files Permit For TV
Station In Modesto

Ralph M. Brown, Modesto attorney,
today made formal application
for Federal Communications
Commission for a television station
here. Brown applied for channel 14
an ultra high frequency station
which would require modification
of most television sets now
in service. One other application,
filed by a San Franciscan, has
been made for the only station
to be permitted in Modesto.
The application was made in

Brown's name, Independent of
radio station KBOX, of which he
is an owner. However, Brown
said present studios of KBOX
were designed with television in
mind. Plans call for a television
antenna near the city if his
application is approved.

Brown has no idea when the
applications will be acted upon
since Modesto is No. 302 on the
list of city TV priorities and the
FCC now is holding hearings on
No 56.

Two local radio stations,
KMOD and KTRB, indicated they
are considering applying for
channel 14 but have not yet made
formal application.

11-24-52

News Briefs

Radio Broadcasting Company of
Turlock, (KTUR)  to construct a one story
building and two radio towers on
Quincy Avenue, between Tuolumne
and Hawkeye Avenues, one and
one quarter miles northeast of Turlock.


5-17-49


FCC Authorizes
Radio Station  KTUR

TURLOCK, April 7, 1949 The Turlock
Broadcasting Company has been
given authority by the Federal
Communications Commission
for a new standard radio station
here. The Associated Press reported
from Washington, DC, the station
will operate on 1390 kilocycles, one
kilowatt, for an unlimited time.
The radio station was organized
approximately three years ago by
several local businessmen under
the name of Turlock Broadcasting
Group.

FM Permit Lapses

A request for a standard  AM
permit was turned down at the
time and subsequent requests also
were denied.
Last year, an FM   frequency
modulation permit was issued to
the group, but the permit was allowed
to lapse as the members did
not wish to operate an FM station
without the regular broadcasting
facilities also. The radio station call letters
will be KTUR.  Partners in the enterprise .are
Wallace Lindskoog. August Linbloom,
Linda Boone, Elmer Hyer,
Herbert Lindgrery, Gordon Mowrer
and Gilbert Moody. 
Moody is attorney for the group,
and H. A. MacMillan is business
manager.

Purchase Tower

Moods reported the station will
be located on the Glaze ranch on
Quincy Road, a half mile east of
the Denair Highway. The towers
were purchased last year, but other
equipment and buildings still are
needed.
He said the group will not seek
an FM permit at the present time.
Moody estimated it will be at
least four months before station
KTUR will be in operrationn. He said
arrangements will begin as
soon as a Civil Aeronautics Admini
istration permit is obtained in regard
to the erection of transmission towers.

4-07-49
New Radio Station (KBOX)
Is Planned Here 

Modesto soon will have a new standard radio station in operation. The Federal Communications Commission in Washington, DC announced today it has given final construction grant to Stanislaus County Broadcasters, Inc. The FCC's grant affirms findings of  the hearing examiner's decision of  September 28th, 1950. The owners, all Modestans, are Assemblyman Ralph M. Brown, Harold Bowen, Cecil Lynch and his father, G. A. Lynch. The station will operate at 970 kilocycles, one kilowatt, unlimited time. Its call letters have not yet been assigned.

The owners said much of the equipment already has been purchased. They plan to have the station on the air in two or three months. The transmitter site towers, etc., have been obtained.  Downtown Studios  Main studios will be downtown. Several locations and under consideration. Company spokesmen said plans call for complete entertainment, news, sports and special events coverage in the Stanislaus district Cecil Lynch, long connected with the radio industry, is expected to be in the managerial capacity.  When it goes on the air it will fourth Modesto radio station in Stanislaus County. 

1-12-51



First Television
Station In SF Is
Near Completion

San Francisco  Nov. 11, 1948 
The first television station in
Northern California, station KPIX
will begin transmitting commercial
broadcasts from the top of the
Mark Hopkins Hotel in San Francisco
about the middle of December.
Philip G. Lasky, vice president
and general manager of the station,
said the station, owned by
Associated Broadcasters, will be a
sister to radio station KSFO and
will start testing operations on its
assigned channel 5 late this
month. The KPIX antenna, five tons or
steel, was constructed after being
hoisted up the outside of the Mark
Hopkins piece by piece. KPIX  will
be the first station in the area west
of Salt Lake City between Los Angeles
and Seattle.

11-11-48



County Hospital Radio Station Is Dedicated

Bed ridden patients of the Stanislaus County Hospital now officially have their own private radio station KSCH.  program of instrumental vocal music Saturday was part dedicatory proceeding in which local civic and religious leaders participated. The program heard in the hospital through loudspeakers placed throughout the wards.  Ceremony In Held  The dedication ceremony staged in the court between Unit 1 and 2, in the rear of the hospital. The invocation was given Rev. William R. Baird. 'H. V. Maloney hospital administrator, introduced representatives of fraternal and religious organizations.

The benediction was given by Rev. John C. Mills. Floyd Allen, on behalf of hospital staff,  presented the recently acquired public address system to  Leo Hammett, chairman the county board of supervisors. The system was acquired through proceeds of a dance sponsored the Stanislaus County Hospital Patients Entertainment Committee and through public contributions. Daily hospital wide entertainment over the station is planned, Combining  live talent and radio shows. All wards have been wired and earphones soon are to be installed. 


6-6-49 

New KXOB Owner Will Push For Stockton TV

STOCKTON—The new owner of radio station KXOB here, Joseph E. Gamble of Palm Springs, will push the station's application for a Stockton television license. The station applied in the middle of 1952 for a very high frequency station on channel 13. Other applicants were KGDM and Radio Diablo. Gamble's purchase must be approved by the Federal Communications Commission. Gamble purchased KXOB From Clem J. Randau, who did not announce his future plans.  

8-06-53


The Modesto Drive-In was located on the eastside of McHenry Ave. just south of  Claratina / Pelendale  intersection.

Downey HS Students Will  Push ‘On The Air’ button  tomorrow   

The final tests have been  made, the transmitter is operating  properly and the broadcasters  have their scripts ready.  Radio station KDHS at Downey  High School, will go on the air for  the first time at 9 a.m. to-  morrow.   One of the few high school  radio stations the country,  KDHS, 90.5 on the radio dial,  will feature campus news, Downey  High School sports, features,  much much more music without  Commercials  according to  its promotional brochure.     Regular broadcasting will, be  2:30 to 7  pm Monday through  Friday, but the first' three days  will be a 12 hour operation,  from 9  a.m. to 9 p.m. to introduce  the station to students. 

KDHS is licensed by the Federal  Communications Commission  and will be, governed by  of Education policy and the student  dent council.  It will have a transmission  range of from 3 to 10 miles,  depending on the receiver, covering  a general area bounded  by Riverbank Road to the north  Wellsford Road to the east, Carpenter Road to the west, and Whitmore Avenue on the south.   Cost of the station is about  $2,500 per year. 

The student  council will pay all costs of  equipment purchase, installation  and operation.  Members of the staff are Gary Copeland,   station manager; Vicki McGhee, program  director; Jeff Cree, chief engineer.   Joanne Stotts, news director;  Monroe McBride, traffic  manager; Jeff Landon,  sports director;  Forest Carmichael  music director and Jelyn Gaskell, council  representative.  The station, originally was scheduled  to begin operating last spring but was delayed because of technical difficulties.



September 4, 1969

KBEE Will Start Broadcasts 
Of Reds Games Tomorrow

Necessary facilities for broadcasting all games played this season  by the Modesto Reds have been installed by KBEE, the Bee's  new frequency modulation radio station. The out of town games will be carried either direct or by recreation.  Lee Kelter, an experienced baseball announcer who has had wide experience in the Northwest, has been engaged to voice the home  games and will handle the recreations on Reds' games played In  other cities. 

Until Kelter arrives In Modesto, Bert Barry of the KFBK staff  In Sacramento will broadcast the Reds' first three home games,  April 27th, 28th and 28th and will do the-Modesto-San Jose series  in San Jose on remote April 30th, May 1st and 2nd,  Kelter will be on hand for the Reds-Stockton Ports series opening May 4th.   


4-22-48 
__________________________________________________


Museum Ed note:  Are your old enough to remember the days when some baseball games, especially out-of-town games,  were RECREATED in local radio station studios?   Baseball fans who grew up listening to games on the radio may be familiar with the term RECREATED or RECREATION.   In recreating a game in studio a printed account of a game would be received by Western Union teletype and turned into a play-by-play description of the action at the ballpark.  The entire game would take place in the broadcasting studio.   The teletype machine feed would be  activated shortly before game time, bringing information about starting lineups, umpires, and weather conditions.  
  
To listeners, the games seemed much the same with only a critical ear noticing vague differences in background sounds. To the broadcaster, however, they were the contrast between the breezes of the ballpark and the confinement of a studio and the challenge of the recreator to describe it.  In order to make the listeners feel more at home  stations would provide recorded crowd noise in the background.   A small wooden mallet striking a suspended baseball in the studio would simulate the sound of the ball striking the bat at the game among other sound effects.


Broadcasting Home Represents
Last Word In Acoustical Engineering 

KWG, the McClatchy Broadcasting Company's radio station in Stockton  and the second oldest station on the Pacific Coast,  goes on the air Monday from new and modern metropolitan studios on top of the Wolf Hotel in the San Joaquin County city. Boasting of a long record of public service KWG will dedicate their new home simultaneously with its switch over to the National Broadcasting Company network and its affiliation with the newly formed California Radio System. 

The Last Word 

The new Stockton studios represent the last word in acoustical engineering and design occupying the major part of the area on the roof  of the hotel which once was devoted to a roof garden. There are two studios, the largest being for broadcasts by orchestral groups. Between the studios is a control room, so arranged  that the operator can monitor  programs from either room, 

One Side Of Glass 

One side of the large studio is composed entirely of glass over which hang full length drapes. A lobby opening off the elevator provides additional spaces for visitors desirous of watching the actual broadcast of programs. The studios are decorated tastefully in soft tones, one being done in a light green with a border of 1 inch darker green and the other studio being finished in cream with hangings of chocolate brown. 

Acoustics Outstanding 

The acoustical treatment is outstanding.  Four inches of  loose rock wool was laid behind perforated acoustical board. The floors are padded with special acoustical padding, over which has been placed a rubber composition flooring, designed to deaden sound.   Complete new speech  input  equipment has beer. Installed, giving KWG the finest modern system science can provide. 

Long Service Record  

KWG has a long record of public service  in Stockton and has been  leader in public activities since its inception. Broadcasting facilities  have been offered by the station to educational, fraternal and social groups, and these organizations now will have available the new facilities of KWG. The studios were designed especially for use as a meeting place for these groups.

12-29-1936






Historic News Clippings
Page 1
Audience Check 

The second annual study of radio audience in Modesto and Turlock has been completed by the Modesto Junior College radio workshop, and results have been sent to broadcasters by the survey director, Edward L. Mc Clarty.  A total of 7,229 calls was made over a two week period in Modesto and 1,425 were made during one week in Turlock. All calls were made between 6 and 10 PM Monday through Friday.  In Modesto, 4,655 calls were completed, of whom 2,077 said they were listening to the radio In Turlock, 867 calls were completed, of whom 398 were tune in. 

Television Queries  For the first time questions on television were asked In both cities, and McClarty said the findings were significant. During the survey, 5.6 percent of those called in Modesto said they owned TV sets. As high as 94 per cent of the TV owners were watching their sets on one night . The low for viewers was 46 per cent. McClarty compared this to radio listenership, which  showed a high of 52 percent sets  in use and a low of 39 per cent. He said the survey showed that only four radio stations serving Modesto had higher weekly audiences than combined TV stations  Expected Changes 

There were some expected changes in audience from last year, McClarty said, due to television, a new station in Modesto and changes in programming by major networks, but the same general pattern was observed. One thing the survey confirmed was that programming is the greatest Influence on dialing stations, and the audience will change stations to listen to programs they choose. McClarty  said this was true In television, too, but reception here was as Important a factor.  Increase In FM Receivers  The survey disclosed 17 per cent Increase In FM receivers Last year 25.8 per cent said they had FM.  30.2. this year.  

There  were about 30 students who participated In the studies. They  were given training in the  technique and theory of radio  audience measurement and will be able to apply their findings to their own  station's programming,  McClarty said.  Students averaged 37 calls per half hour interviewing period. McClarty said students credited much of the success of their study to the assistance given them by telephone company  personnel. 

12-6-1950
Call Letters Are Given for
Modesto's New Station 


Call letters of Modesto's newest AM radio station are KBOX. They were assigned the Stanislaus County Broadcasters by the Federal Communications Com- mission. John Boyer, director of public  relations for KBOX, said the station is scheduled to be on the air around June 1st.

Construction of a downtown studio, on Tenth near O Street, will start  in a few days. It will be of modern architecture. Off street parking areas will be provided. Transmitter site of KBOX is on the Sylvan Road. There will be three transmitter towers. The station's signal will come in on  970 on the standard radio dials.  Boyer said all necessary equipment and materials have been acquired.


2-17-51


Bill Bates prior to building KTRB Modesto owned and operated a radio repair shop in the Covell building in downtown Modesto from 1925 to 1928 .  This ad appeared on Nov. 21, 1926.

October 3, 1942


Modesto had several "air conditioned" movie theaters in the 40's and 50's including the Princess.  (June 19, 1945.)

(5-15-53)

Emergency Radio
Blackout Plan Is
Ready To Operate

SACRAMENTO—Conelrad,
an emergency plan for radio stations
designed to confuse enemy
aircraft, is ready today to operate
throughout California, state
Civil Defense headquarters an
nounced. One hundred nine of the
state's 150 standard radio stations
are equipped to change to emergency
frequencies — 640 and 1240 on
the dial— if an attack warning is
sounded. The OCD said 20 more
will be added soon.

Prevent Attacks

Conelrad, which means control
of electromagnetic radiation, is
supposed to prevent enemy pilots
from being guided to targets by
radio beams. During its use, FM
and TV stations shut down and
Conelrad equipped stations broadcast
information on the two
special frequencies.

Radio Listings in Modesto Bee in 1953

NOTICE— If your radio programs are
Interrupted and you hear the
announcement "This is a conelrad
radio alert." turn your set to 640 kcs
or 1240 kcs tor civil defense
information.

KBEE-FM................103.3 Megacycles
KFRC ................... 610  Kilocycles
KCBS....................740  Kilocycles
KNBC................... 680  Kilocycles
KMOD ................. 1360 Kilocycles
KTRB................... 860  Kilocycles
KBOX................... 970  Kilocycles

Note: KBEE is a frequency modulation
station. It operate! daily from 10 AM to
11 PM, The station cannot be received on
sets containing only AM standard radio


5-15-53

(See story on Conelrad 4)

(11-24-52)

Attorney Ralph Brown
Files Permit For TV
Station In Modesto

Ralph M. Brown, Modesto attorney,
today made formal application
for Federal Communications
Commission for a television station
here. Brown applied for channel 14
an ultra high frequency station
which would require modification
of most television sets now
in service. One other application,
filed by a San Franciscan, has
been made for the only station
to be permitted in Modesto.
The application was made in

Brown's name, Independent of
radio station KBOX, of which he
is an owner. However, Brown
said present studios of KBOX
were designed with television in
mind. Plans call for a television
antenna near the city if his
application is approved.

Brown has no idea when the
applications will be acted upon
since Modesto is No. 302 on the
list of city TV priorities and the
FCC now is holding hearings on
No 56.

Two local radio stations,
KMOD and KTRB, indicated they
are considering applying for
channel 14 but have not yet made
formal application.

11-24-52

News Briefs

Radio Broadcasting Company of
Turlock, (KTUR)  to construct a one story
building and two radio towers on
Quincy Avenue, between Tuolumne
and Hawkeye Avenues, one and
one quarter miles northeast of Turlock.


5-17-49


FCC Authorizes
Radio Station  KTUR

TURLOCK, April 7, 1949 The Turlock
Broadcasting Company has been
given authority by the Federal
Communications Commission
for a new standard radio station
here. The Associated Press reported
from Washington, DC, the station
will operate on 1390 kilocycles, one
kilowatt, for an unlimited time.
The radio station was organized
approximately three years ago by
several local businessmen under
the name of Turlock Broadcasting
Group.

FM Permit Lapses

A request for a standard  AM
permit was turned down at the
time and subsequent requests also
were denied.
Last year, an FM   frequency
modulation permit was issued to
the group, but the permit was allowed
to lapse as the members did
not wish to operate an FM station
without the regular broadcasting
facilities also. The radio station call letters
will be KTUR.  Partners in the enterprise .are
Wallace Lindskoog. August Linbloom,
Linda Boone, Elmer Hyer,
Herbert Lindgrery, Gordon Mowrer
and Gilbert Moody. 
Moody is attorney for the group,
and H. A. MacMillan is business
manager.

Purchase Tower

Moods reported the station will
be located on the Glaze ranch on
Quincy Road, a half mile east of
the Denair Highway. The towers
were purchased last year, but other
equipment and buildings still are
needed.
He said the group will not seek
an FM permit at the present time.
Moody estimated it will be at
least four months before station
KTUR will be in operrationn. He said
arrangements will begin as
soon as a Civil Aeronautics Admini
istration permit is obtained in regard
to the erection of transmission towers.

4-07-49
New Radio Station (KBOX)
Is Planned Here 

Modesto soon will have a new standard radio station in operation. The Federal Communications Commission in Washington, DC announced today it has given final construction grant to Stanislaus County Broadcasters, Inc. The FCC's grant affirms findings of  the hearing examiner's decision of  September 28th, 1950. The owners, all Modestans, are Assemblyman Ralph M. Brown, Harold Bowen, Cecil Lynch and his father, G. A. Lynch. The station will operate at 970 kilocycles, one kilowatt, unlimited time. Its call letters have not yet been assigned.

The owners said much of the equipment already has been purchased. They plan to have the station on the air in two or three months. The transmitter site towers, etc., have been obtained.  Downtown Studios  Main studios will be downtown. Several locations and under consideration. Company spokesmen said plans call for complete entertainment, news, sports and special events coverage in the Stanislaus district Cecil Lynch, long connected with the radio industry, is expected to be in the managerial capacity.  When it goes on the air it will fourth Modesto radio station in Stanislaus County. 

1-12-51



First Television
Station In SF Is
Near Completion

San Francisco  Nov. 11, 1948 
The first television station in
Northern California, station KPIX
will begin transmitting commercial
broadcasts from the top of the
Mark Hopkins Hotel in San Francisco
about the middle of December.
Philip G. Lasky, vice president
and general manager of the station,
said the station, owned by
Associated Broadcasters, will be a
sister to radio station KSFO and
will start testing operations on its
assigned channel 5 late this
month. The KPIX antenna, five tons or
steel, was constructed after being
hoisted up the outside of the Mark
Hopkins piece by piece. KPIX  will
be the first station in the area west
of Salt Lake City between Los Angeles
and Seattle.

11-11-48



County Hospital Radio Station Is Dedicated

Bed ridden patients of the Stanislaus County Hospital now officially have their own private radio station KSCH.  program of instrumental vocal music Saturday was part dedicatory proceeding in which local civic and religious leaders participated. The program heard in the hospital through loudspeakers placed throughout the wards.  Ceremony In Held  The dedication ceremony staged in the court between Unit 1 and 2, in the rear of the hospital. The invocation was given Rev. William R. Baird. 'H. V. Maloney hospital administrator, introduced representatives of fraternal and religious organizations.

The benediction was given by Rev. John C. Mills. Floyd Allen, on behalf of hospital staff,  presented the recently acquired public address system to  Leo Hammett, chairman the county board of supervisors. The system was acquired through proceeds of a dance sponsored the Stanislaus County Hospital Patients Entertainment Committee and through public contributions. Daily hospital wide entertainment over the station is planned, Combining  live talent and radio shows. All wards have been wired and earphones soon are to be installed. 


6-6-49 

New KXOB Owner Will Push For Stockton TV

STOCKTON—The new owner of radio station KXOB here, Joseph E. Gamble of Palm Springs, will push the station's application for a Stockton television license. The station applied in the middle of 1952 for a very high frequency station on channel 13. Other applicants were KGDM and Radio Diablo. Gamble's purchase must be approved by the Federal Communications Commission. Gamble purchased KXOB From Clem J. Randau, who did not announce his future plans.  

8-06-53


The Modesto Drive-In was located on the eastside of McHenry Ave. just south of  Claratina / Pelendale  intersection.

Downey HS Students Will  Push ‘On The Air’ button  tomorrow   

The final tests have been  made, the transmitter is operating  properly and the broadcasters  have their scripts ready.  Radio station KDHS at Downey  High School, will go on the air for  the first time at 9 a.m. to-  morrow.   One of the few high school  radio stations the country,  KDHS, 90.5 on the radio dial,  will feature campus news, Downey  High School sports, features,  much much more music without  Commercials  according to  its promotional brochure.     Regular broadcasting will, be  2:30 to 7  pm Monday through  Friday, but the first' three days  will be a 12 hour operation,  from 9  a.m. to 9 p.m. to introduce  the station to students. 

KDHS is licensed by the Federal  Communications Commission  and will be, governed by  of Education policy and the student  dent council.  It will have a transmission  range of from 3 to 10 miles,  depending on the receiver, covering  a general area bounded  by Riverbank Road to the north  Wellsford Road to the east, Carpenter Road to the west, and Whitmore Avenue on the south.   Cost of the station is about  $2,500 per year. 

The student  council will pay all costs of  equipment purchase, installation  and operation.  Members of the staff are Gary Copeland,   station manager; Vicki McGhee, program  director; Jeff Cree, chief engineer.   Joanne Stotts, news director;  Monroe McBride, traffic  manager; Jeff Landon,  sports director;  Forest Carmichael  music director and Jelyn Gaskell, council  representative.  The station, originally was scheduled  to begin operating last spring but was delayed because of technical difficulties.



September 4, 1969

KBEE Will Start Broadcasts 
Of Reds Games Tomorrow

Necessary facilities for broadcasting all games played this season  by the Modesto Reds have been installed by KBEE, the Bee's  new frequency modulation radio station. The out of town games will be carried either direct or by recreation.  Lee Kelter, an experienced baseball announcer who has had wide experience in the Northwest, has been engaged to voice the home  games and will handle the recreations on Reds' games played In  other cities. 

Until Kelter arrives In Modesto, Bert Barry of the KFBK staff  In Sacramento will broadcast the Reds' first three home games,  April 27th, 28th and 28th and will do the-Modesto-San Jose series  in San Jose on remote April 30th, May 1st and 2nd,  Kelter will be on hand for the Reds-Stockton Ports series opening May 4th.   


4-22-48 
__________________________________________________


Museum Ed note:  Are your old enough to remember the days when some baseball games, especially out-of-town games,  were RECREATED in local radio station studios?   Baseball fans who grew up listening to games on the radio may be familiar with the term RECREATED or RECREATION.   In recreating a game in studio a printed account of a game would be received by Western Union teletype and turned into a play-by-play description of the action at the ballpark.  The entire game would take place in the broadcasting studio.   The teletype machine feed would be  activated shortly before game time, bringing information about starting lineups, umpires, and weather conditions.  
  
To listeners, the games seemed much the same with only a critical ear noticing vague differences in background sounds. To the broadcaster, however, they were the contrast between the breezes of the ballpark and the confinement of a studio and the challenge of the recreator to describe it.  In order to make the listeners feel more at home  stations would provide recorded crowd noise in the background.   A small wooden mallet striking a suspended baseball in the studio would simulate the sound of the ball striking the bat at the game among other sound effects.


Broadcasting Home Represents
Last Word In Acoustical Engineering 

KWG, the McClatchy Broadcasting Company's radio station in Stockton  and the second oldest station on the Pacific Coast,  goes on the air Monday from new and modern metropolitan studios on top of the Wolf Hotel in the San Joaquin County city. Boasting of a long record of public service KWG will dedicate their new home simultaneously with its switch over to the National Broadcasting Company network and its affiliation with the newly formed California Radio System. 

The Last Word 

The new Stockton studios represent the last word in acoustical engineering and design occupying the major part of the area on the roof  of the hotel which once was devoted to a roof garden. There are two studios, the largest being for broadcasts by orchestral groups. Between the studios is a control room, so arranged  that the operator can monitor  programs from either room, 

One Side Of Glass 

One side of the large studio is composed entirely of glass over which hang full length drapes. A lobby opening off the elevator provides additional spaces for visitors desirous of watching the actual broadcast of programs. The studios are decorated tastefully in soft tones, one being done in a light green with a border of 1 inch darker green and the other studio being finished in cream with hangings of chocolate brown. 

Acoustics Outstanding 

The acoustical treatment is outstanding.  Four inches of  loose rock wool was laid behind perforated acoustical board. The floors are padded with special acoustical padding, over which has been placed a rubber composition flooring, designed to deaden sound.   Complete new speech  input  equipment has beer. Installed, giving KWG the finest modern system science can provide. 

Long Service Record  

KWG has a long record of public service  in Stockton and has been  leader in public activities since its inception. Broadcasting facilities  have been offered by the station to educational, fraternal and social groups, and these organizations now will have available the new facilities of KWG. The studios were designed especially for use as a meeting place for these groups.

12-29-1936


(From news-clippings 12-29-1936 archives)
KWG New Broadcasting Home Last Word In Engineering

KWG, the McClatchy Broadcasting Company's radio station in Stockton  and the second oldest station on the Pacific Coast,  goes on the air Monday from new and modern metropolitan studios on top of the Wolf Hotel in the San Joaquin County city. Boasting of a long record of public service KWG will dedicate their new home simultaneously with its switch over to the National Broadcasting Company network and its affiliation with the newly formed California Radio System.

The Last Word

The new Stockton studios represent the last word in acoustical engineering and design occupying the major part of the area on the roof  of the hotel which once was devoted to a roof garden. There are two studios, the largest being for broadcasts by orchestral groups. Between the studios is a control room, so arranged  that the operator can monitor  programs from either room,

One Side Of Glass

One side of the large studio is composed entirely of glass over which hang full length drapes. A lobby opening off the elevator provides additional spaces for visitors desirous of watching the actual broadcast of programs. The studios are decorated tastefully in soft tones, one being done in a light green with a border of 1 inch darker green and the other studio being finished in cream with hangings of chocolate brown.

Acoustics Outstanding

The acoustical treatment is outstanding.  Four inches of  loose rock wool was laid behind perforated acoustical board. The floors are padded with special acoustical padding, over which has been placed a rubber composition flooring, designed to deaden sound.   Complete new speech  input  equipment has beer. Installed, giving KWG the finest modern system science can provide.

Long Service Record 

KWG has a long record of public service  in Stockton and has been  leader in public activities since its inception. Broadcasting facilities  have been offered by the station to educational, fraternal and social groups, and these organizations now will have available the new facilities of KWG. The studios were designed especially for use as a meeting place for these groups.

12-29-1936