During the years 1936-1938 my life was all Tom Mix, Buck Jones, Gene Autry, Tim McCoy and any other western cowboy stars of movies and stage.

To have a radio station in your own town was a real treat. I can remember Bill Bates advertising rainbow doughnuts for 5 cents each and coffee at 5 cents a cup to dunk them into. A trip to the doughnut shop was a real treat as a movie cost 10 cents and sometimes only a nickel was available. The depression was still taking its toll.

At 6 a.m. each morning I was up with my hobby horse and with my cowboy outfit on and ready to ride around the dining room table. That cowboy outfit including boots was bought up on 10th Street from the old Coey Shoe Store. My dad got a lecture for blowing $8.95 On such nonsense when money was so tight.

Oh, how many bumps I received from cutting too close to the table comers. However the bumps were well worth hearing the refrains of KTRB's Swanee Cowboys direct from the radio station. The refrains of "Little Girl Dressed in Blue;" 'Home on the Range," "Bury Me Not on the Lone Prairie" and many others.

What a thrill when my mother, Sara Woodbridge, sent to KTRB for a photo of the Swanee Cowboys. I remember it cost her 20 cents. 




Remembering The Swanee Cowboys
By Lyndell Woodbridge
Modesto, CA

The Swanee Cowboys from left to right (top row):  Sidney London (Si) , Stanley Dennis (Skeeter),  Announcer Erroll Peck. (Bottom Row):  Roy Sanderson (Hungry) and Eldon Barrick (Slats) . The Swanee Cowboys were the first prominent live KTRB program from 1934-1936. 




Swanee Cowboys photo postcard  dated Nov 2,1934. Note the 1 cent postage stamp.  
(Courtesy of Gerry Howard)